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First time in Tokyo?!Comentarios • First time in Tokyo?!

  • 1pt
    chapters0 (Hace 2 meses) #51546919This is what i'm worried about, I'm horrible at directions! so i dont know how i will navigate the tthe trains at all!
    The trains honestly aren't as difficult as it seems, unless you are colour blind. Each line is denoted with a different colour so even if you can't read what line it is, you can differentiate by matching the colours from Google Maps. JR lines also have symbols along with the colours (like the Musashino line is referenced as "JM" along with being bright orange).

    After you have found the line you wanted the get on, you only need to make sure you are going the right direction. Even if you went the wrong way, Japan fares are calculated by the distance you travelled from station A to station B at the gates, so I don't think you would pay more for being lost, only losing time. For me, I always leave 10~ minutes before the time Google tells me in case I'm a slow walker/I get lost. If you aren't in a hurry during your trip, you definitely won't have a problem with the trains.

    It may be a bit difficult on the first day, but once you've established a base, you will start to get used to the lines you are always taking based on the stations that are closest to you. I think taking the train is one of the many Japan experiences that one shouldn't miss out on xD But try not to take the train during rush hour if you aren't used to it yet lol.

    Heck, you might get used to Tokyo so fast you wished you had planned to visit elsewhere too haha. For nearby areas outside Tokyo, I would suggest Mt. Fuji and Yokohama.
    Hace 2 meses
    1pt
    lugiastrikes (Hace 2 meses) #51442583Second this! I was actually lost in Shinjuku JR station just YESTERDAY. Lol, I was getting kind of scared because I am currently traveling alone and there were so many people and none of the platforms (there were like, 14 platforms?) showed the color line I wanted to get on.
    I had to ask 3 station attendants (the first one was kind of rude and directed me to a place that's not where I wanted to go because I tried to show him my Google Maps route but it was in English so he probably couldn't read jacksh*t, so I went to a different gate in the station to ask someone else) only to find out that I was in the Shinjuku JR station and that is completely separate from the local train station with the same name LOL. The second attendant had to direct me to the station gates closest to the local train station and I had to ask the third attendant there to find my way from the JR station entrance to the local station. Japan why are you so confusing.
    Not to scare away new travelers or anything. But I am extremely directional challenged and I still made it home in one piece so it's all good in the end xD
    Another thing that might help if you are as bad with directions as I am, is to make sure you have a compass app on your phone. I've always had it just in case I get lost in a forest somewhere but OKAY here's another story. So I'm not sure if this is the same for everywhere in America, but when you use Google Maps, your pointer has a little cone radius pointing out the direction you are facing, right? WELL, apparently this is not a thing in Japan and Google Maps only show you this lame little dot. So at first I would walk a block down the street just to realize I am going the opposite direction and had to walk all the way back (just to get lost again when I turn a corner), but nowadays my compass app works side-to-side with my Google Maps and it's soooo useful.

    This is what i'm worried about, I'm horrible at directions! so i dont know how i will navigate the tthe trains at all!

    moonangelica (Hace 2 meses) #51411328I'm also going to Japan for the first time in a month. I've found that advice sites like japan-guide and Matcha really useful.
    I'm going for 3 weeks but going all over Japan. For just staying in Tokyo maybe 2 weeks? Work out what you want to see and how long it will take and work from there.
    Also don't be afraid to head out of Tokyo for day trips. Nearby there is Nikko, Hakone, Kamakura, Kawagoe just to name a few. All are easily accessible via train.
    For accommodation, I'm staying in an airbnb, but there are quite reasonable hotels and hostels as well.


    I'll take a look there! let me know how it goes! thanks
    Hace 2 meses
    1pt
    Ruritto (Hace 2 meses) #51439387The train systems were pretty easy but we did use mostly big stations or ones near tourist sites. Hyperdia was a big help since it also had track numbers. Also don't be afraid to ask the staff for help when youre at stations. Some of the Tokyo ones are veeeery confusing. Shinjuku JR station is so easy to get lost in.
    Second this! I was actually lost in Shinjuku JR station just YESTERDAY. Lol, I was getting kind of scared because I am currently traveling alone and there were so many people and none of the platforms (there were like, 14 platforms?) showed the color line I wanted to get on.

    I had to ask 3 station attendants (the first one was kind of rude and directed me to a place that's not where I wanted to go because I tried to show him my Google Maps route but it was in English so he probably couldn't read jacksh*t, so I went to a different gate in the station to ask someone else) only to find out that I was in the Shinjuku JR station and that is completely separate from the local train station with the same name LOL. The second attendant had to direct me to the station gates closest to the local train station and I had to ask the third attendant there to find my way from the JR station entrance to the local station. Japan why are you so confusing.

    Not to scare away new travelers or anything. But I am extremely directional challenged and I still made it home in one piece so it's all good in the end xD


    Another thing that might help if you are as bad with directions as I am, is to make sure you have a compass app on your phone. I've always had it just in case I get lost in a forest somewhere but OKAY here's another story. So I'm not sure if this is the same for everywhere in America, but when you use Google Maps, your pointer has a little cone radius pointing out the direction you are facing, right? WELL, apparently this is not a thing in Japan and Google Maps only show you this lame little dot. So at first I would walk a block down the street just to realize I am going the opposite direction and had to walk all the way back (just to get lost again when I turn a corner), but nowadays my compass app works side-to-side with my Google Maps and it's soooo useful.
    Hace 2 meses
    1pt
    chapters0 (Hace 2 meses) #51356839

    My rule for traveling overseas (Japan or not) is to have at least 2 weeks. Mainly because you will spend the first couple days dealing with jetlag and figuring out your immediate surrounding area.

    It depends on what you wish to accomplish on your trip. But 2 weeks is enough for a brief visit. When I first went to Japan for vacation I spent 3 weeks, but I visited many other places outside of Tokyo too.

    You can buy a Pasmo card (Pasmo is an IC card like Suica, the only difference is that you purchase it at a Tokyo train station and Suica is from a JR station, they all relatively work in the same areas across the country/outside of Tokyo) at a machine in the airport. I would assume it's by the train station gates (I got mine years ago so I don't quite remember the exact location).

    You can ask at an information desk for direction when you get there. Narita has many help desks everywhere after you exit the baggage claim. When I bought my Pasmo card, they even printed my name on the card before spitting it out to me so it's a little personalized xD IC cards stay active and don't expire unless it's inactive for 10 years, so you can keep it for your next trip if you plan on returning.

    To get out of the airport, you can take some airport express train lines or the bus. I personally took the bus because it only costs 1000yen and it takes you directly to Tokyo station (I didn't have to worry about fighting other people's luggages or wondering when to get off the train). Tokyo station is kinda big and busy though so make sure you know your next step of transportation if you take the bus.

    Also, Tokyo probably has like hundreds of train stations, so don't bother printing the station names out xD The station itself always have English somewhere, but sometimes their platform descriptions don't say the exact same thing as what Google Map tells you so just be careful and double check before you jump on a train lol.
    Hace 2 meses
    1pt
    chapters0 (Hace 2 meses) #51356809thanks Everybody for your answers! So from the airport to hotel, is the train easily accessible? How would I go about this?
    I'm really worried about the train system, where would i buy the pass?
    As for the train in general, would it be easier to travel with a sheet of paper with all the station in japanese? (kanji or romaji?)


    There are buses aside from the train from the airport which are slower but more available depending on what time you get there.

    I was trying to remember where I got the pass last time and I believe I either ordered it through klook to be claimed at the airport or got it at the machines. I think it was via klook. You can try cehcking it out since they also offer JR Passes, airport bus/train tickets etc. Very useful

    The train systems were pretty easy but we did use mostly big stations or ones near tourist sites. Hyperdia was a big help since it also had track numbers. Also don't be afraid to ask the staff for help when youre at stations. Some of the Tokyo ones are veeeery confusing. Shinjuku JR station is so easy to get lost in.

    Btw, it makes life easy but if you're just staying in Tokyo don't get a JR Pass. It wouldn't be worth it. You can try looking up a JR Pass calculator to see if it's worth it if you decide to go outside Tokyo.
    Hace 2 meses
    2pt
    I'm also going to Japan for the first time in a month. I've found that advice sites like japan-guide and Matcha really useful.

    I'm going for 3 weeks but going all over Japan. For just staying in Tokyo maybe 2 weeks? Work out what you want to see and how long it will take and work from there.

    Also don't be afraid to head out of Tokyo for day trips. Nearby there is Nikko, Hakone, Kamakura, Kawagoe just to name a few. All are easily accessible via train.

    For accommodation, I'm staying in an airbnb, but there are quite reasonable hotels and hostels as well.
    Hace 2 meses
    2pt
    1. Depending on your budget. I use online booking site, like Agoda with no issues so far (more than 10 times). Some hotels they won't speak English well but they will try. I'm a cheapo so I usually get a small room (10-12m^2 size) with own bathtub, for around $40-60 a night where English is limited. I also stayed at $250 a night ones like American Marriott (they will be very American) but prefer the cheaper ones. I tried the capsule hotels several times for $20-25 a night as well.
    2. If you're just in Tokyo no bullet train. Just take Metro or JR lines. There are also other private rail lines. They all have English and use Google Maps, it's very easy. Signs all have English and it's very intuitive.
    3. There's everything. If you like Anime visit Akihabara first. And Nakano has a great area called Nakano Broadway where there are loads of Mandarake and other small anime/figure related stores.
    4. Google Translate is good enough for a start.
    5. Be polite, wait in line, don't eat and drink in areas you're not supposed to, don't take pictures where stores say you can't, don't talk on phone when you're on train or in quiet areas, take shoes off when entering residences or specific areas inside of hotels/restaurants,

    If you have questions feel free to PM me
    Hace 2 meses
    2pt
    ponnie ~Donyatsu Huntress~
    Also, a thing to know about Japanese local train stations. They have multiple exits and entrances, and very few of them feature both in and out escalators. One can be just stairs, another can be in escalator and stairs, one more one with just an elevator and all of them on differen sides of one intersection or street, sometimes somewhat hidden behind more flashy signs. So make sure you know the easiest entrance or you might end up dragging heavy bags by stairs. Or crawl your way out with something heavy because you missed an elevator exit sign when exiting. These details are really worth noticing )
    Hace 2 meses
    2pt
    ponnie ~Donyatsu Huntress~
    chapters0 (Hace 2 meses) #51356809thanks Everybody for your answers! So from the airport to hotel, is the train easily accessible? How would I go about this?
    I'm really worried about the train system, where would i buy the pass?
    As for the train in general, would it be easier to travel with a sheet of paper with all the station in japanese? (kanji or romaji?)

    You can order JR Pass (fixed-time multi pass for shinkansen in case you want to travel between cities) or pre-paid Suica card online, tourist service sites deliver by FedEx which is very quick. I had to buy JR Pass so I got a Suica along with it. Got my envelope in, like, 3 days, a week before leaving for Japan.

    Or just buy Suica at any station, load it with cash and just use it to enter and exit stations. They also sell them at arrival shops in Narita.

    Narita has a straight pass to the station, it's about 40 minutes on a train to get to the central Tokyo.

    Google Maps will tell you which train to take to get to your hotel, including time and platform. It literally calculates your route and tells you where to go in your own language and doubles station names with kanji in case you want to ask someone local where to find an entrance. It's really easy, just make sure you have a power bank at hand in case your phone battery will need charging in the middle of the day.

    Most venues and even streets in Japan have wifi. But in case you need a stable connection of your own, buy a pre-paid sim card at one of the booths at the airport (won't miss them, they are right at the exit). This will give you a stable and cheap 4G for all your needs for something like 3000-5000 yen depending on the plan you choose. Otherwise you might be unpleasantly surprised with roaming costs of every byte entering your phone.

    So, basically, make sure you have stable internet, enough battery life and suica. And you won't need any paper maps on you to get anywhere in Japan, even the very rural areas.
    Hace 2 meses
    1pt
    chapters0 (Hace 2 meses) #51356809thanks Everybody for your answers! So from the airport to hotel, is the train easily accessible? How would I go about this?
    I'm really worried about the train system, where would i buy the pass?
    As for the train in general, would it be easier to travel with a sheet of paper with all the station in japanese? (kanji or romaji?)

    U can buy the pass(Suica card) at the counter at most major train stations. Alternatively, you can get it when you reach Narita or Haneda, they have train stations there.
    You only need to worry of the station names in kanji if you are checking out the fare for per trip tickets. Only the major stations have them in English, the rest are in kanji. :P If you get the reloadable Suica card, then you dun have to bother. Just having the subway map that I mentioned is good enough.
    Hace 2 meses
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