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Nopan figure data [NSFW]Comentarios • Nopan figure data [NSFW]

  • 2pt
    vgadict (Hace 3 meses) #48943327There were listings on Ebay in the late 1990s/early 2000s timeframe for resin kits of various anime-inspired or game-inspired figures. Before I got into PVC figures, I bought a few resin kits, but I never assembled them. A few of the ones I own are full or partially nude, or they are designed in a way that the lower part of the outfit could be left off. Some don't have much anatomical detail, but others do. Most of the ones I own don't include much documentation beyond a crude page of assembly instructions which makes it extremely difficult to determine when they were originally released.
    From a design standpoint, 1/6 scale is very convenient for English units: 1 inch = half a foot in 1/6 scale. For metric units, it is also somewhat convenient; if average human height is approximately 1.8 meters, at 1/6 scale, the figure would be a nice round 30 cm tall.
    The 1/6 scale also traces its roots to dolls and action figures. Barbie dolls debuted in 1959 and fit the 1/6 scale. The original G.I.Joe action figures from the 1960s also used 1/6 scale. The popularity of these dolls and action figures led to a large number of accessories (houses, vehicles, clothing, etc) being produced at that scale, as well as other dolls and action figures using the similar scale. Later, a new smaller scale was used for the G.I.Joe figures, but Barbie dolls still use 1/6.
    As for why PVC figures have continued to use this scale, I suspect there are a mix of reasons. If factories and equipment were previously setup for production of 1/6 scale dolls and action figures, it might require fewer updates to support new figures at that scale. The scale also seems to have a sweet-spot between not being too big yet still supporting a high level of detail. When PVC figures started becoming popular, there was already an established market of collectors of dolls and figures of 1/6 scale, so it wouldn't be a huge stretch for PVC figure companies to assume that some of those collectors might also be interested in buying PVC figures. Once PVC figure sales data started to be analyzed, they could easily see which figure scales were selling well. The fact they are still producing many figures at that scale would imply that there is a healthy market for that scale.
    I may do further analysis showing the shift in scales over time. From what I've observed there appear to be some trends there, but I have not done much investigation yet.


    Thanks for this thoughtful reply. Really appreciate. I do recall the late 1990s/early 2000s GKs that could be found on auction sites. A few of them had a lot in common with the current erotic offerings.

    Thanks for pointing out the 12 inches - 1/6 scale comparison. I can't believe I never saw the link between the two scales. Your hypothesis if worth pursuing. Think about the 80s anime vinyl kits manufactured by Tsukuda, particularly the Urusei Yatsura lineup. Also, many GP garage kit (Gainax) were also in the 1/6 range. It would indeed be interesting to see if it was truly a common scale.

    Good luck with your searches!
    Hace 3 meses
    3pt
    laprasdewgong (Hace 3 meses) #48933831This is one very interesting article. I'm happy to see such passion for a theme like this.
    Have to say I'm surprised to see Taki so high in that chart of Nopan figures even when they closed some years ago already. They were a mixed bag.

    From 2008 through 2010, Taki released several versions of various Ikki Tousen characters (Ryomou Shimei, Ryofu Housen, Kan'u Unchou, etc) which had no panties or could be cast off. Most of them feature little to no anatomical detail, but still qualify as nopan figures.

    laprasdewgong (Hace 3 meses) #48933831Hmm.. by the way, I don't recall any cast-offable figure of Mai ! That was one interesting highlight.
    This is somewhat of an oddball figure. It has twistable joints at locations like the neck, waist and hands similar to an action figure, but legs and other parts are in a fixed pose. The clothing is a cloth material making it easy to remove. However, it's got some issues. The neck is disproportionately large which makes her head look too small. The figure also lacks much detail, though she is a step above being a pure barbie down below. Besides its apparent historical significance, the most impressive asset(s) of this figure is probably the modeling of her breasts. Unfortunately, the painting on the versions I've seen falls short and looks very rushed.

    Also note there is another version (ITEM #13872) released the same year by Blue Box Toys that uses PVC for the clothing and has a different head sculpt. It's not clear if that version can be castoff. The version with the cloth clothing (ITEM #7948) can be fully castoff. The cloth version also has a different style package (tall clear half-tube with no outer card back)

    Back in the mid-2000s, there were many listings on Ebay for this figure, usually for around $20 USD or less. Given how many I saw listed over the years, they must have produced a lot of these figures. They're getting harder to find now, but I still see them listed occasionally.
    Hace 3 meses
    1pt
    sailormatlac (Hace 3 meses) #48930397As for your question about older figures, it is true some obscure garage kits were indeed made. However, I recall seeing a few ones and they were extremely simplistic. In the late 1990s, a set of nude Sailor Moon figures depicting them as angel did exist, but they lacked the sexy kind of appeal we associate with the current production. We have to remember the casting process back then wasn't great, particularly among amateur circle. It would have been quite hard to have good results. However, I recall that in the early 2000s, it was common to see Japanese modellers customizing existing figures in nopan form. Some did it on a commercial basis and sold their work on Yahoo!Japan Auctions. I'm pretty sure it still going though I have visited Y!J for ages.
    There were listings on Ebay in the late 1990s/early 2000s timeframe for resin kits of various anime-inspired or game-inspired figures. Before I got into PVC figures, I bought a few resin kits, but I never assembled them. A few of the ones I own are full or partially nude, or they are designed in a way that the lower part of the outfit could be left off. Some don't have much anatomical detail, but others do. Most of the ones I own don't include much documentation beyond a crude page of assembly instructions which makes it extremely difficult to determine when they were originally released.

    sailormatlac (Hace 3 meses) #48930397As for the scale, I've always been surprised how 1/6 what common - almost a standard. Your stats seem to confirm that too. Now, I'd like to know why. I suspect it is an excellent scale to work such intricate details (sculpture, castoff, accessories, etc.). Smaller and it gets tricky, if bigger you start to loose a sizable part of your customers due to space and financial constraints. Funnily enough, I guess it's why I have many of them though I never cast them off. I've always had a preference for larger figures, thus I end up buying a lot of 1/6 which are generally castoffable.
    From a design standpoint, 1/6 scale is very convenient for English units: 1 inch = half a foot in 1/6 scale. For metric units, it is also somewhat convenient; if average human height is approximately 1.8 meters, at 1/6 scale, the figure would be a nice round 30 cm tall.

    The 1/6 scale also traces its roots to dolls and action figures. Barbie dolls debuted in 1959 and fit the 1/6 scale. The original G.I.Joe action figures from the 1960s also used 1/6 scale. The popularity of these dolls and action figures led to a large number of accessories (houses, vehicles, clothing, etc) being produced at that scale, as well as other dolls and action figures using the similar scale. Later, a new smaller scale was used for the G.I.Joe figures, but Barbie dolls still use 1/6.

    As for why PVC figures have continued to use this scale, I suspect there are a mix of reasons. If factories and equipment were previously setup for production of 1/6 scale dolls and action figures, it might require fewer updates to support new figures at that scale. The scale also seems to have a sweet-spot between not being too big yet still supporting a high level of detail. When PVC figures started becoming popular, there was already an established market of collectors of dolls and figures of 1/6 scale, so it wouldn't be a huge stretch for PVC figure companies to assume that some of those collectors might also be interested in buying PVC figures. Once PVC figure sales data started to be analyzed, they could easily see which figure scales were selling well. The fact they are still producing many figures at that scale would imply that there is a healthy market for that scale.

    I may do further analysis showing the shift in scales over time. From what I've observed there appear to be some trends there, but I have not done much investigation yet.
    Hace 3 meses
    2pt
    This is one very interesting article. I'm happy to see such passion for a theme like this.
    Have to say I'm surprised to see Taki so high in that chart of Nopan figures even when they closed some years ago already. They were a mixed bag.

    Hmm.. by the way, I don't recall any cast-offable figure of Mai ! That was one interesting highlight.
    Hace 3 meses
    2pt
    I hold no particular interest in nopan figures, but they are a sizable part of this hobby and ignoring their existence would be both futile and a lack of insight. And to be honest, I own a few because it's not rare they have excellent design. For this reason, I find your analysis extremely interesting and useful. It confirms my impression it was mainly a post-2006 phenomenon, whichis coupled by both the fact anime when full fandom at that point and manufacturing process of PVC was picking up steam.

    As for your question about older figures, it is true some obscure garage kits were indeed made. However, I recall seeing a few ones and they were extremely simplistic. In the late 1990s, a set of nude Sailor Moon figures depicting them as angel did exist, but they lacked the sexy kind of appeal we associate with the current production. We have to remember the casting process back then wasn't great, particularly among amateur circle. It would have been quite hard to have good results. However, I recall that in the early 2000s, it was common to see Japanese modellers customizing existing figures in nopan form. Some did it on a commercial basis and sold their work on Yahoo!Japan Auctions. I'm pretty sure it still going though I have visited Y!J for ages.

    As for the scale, I've always been surprised how 1/6 what common - almost a standard. Your stats seem to confirm that too. Now, I'd like to know why. I suspect it is an excellent scale to work such intricate details (sculpture, castoff, accessories, etc.). Smaller and it gets tricky, if bigger you start to loose a sizable part of your customers due to space and financial constraints. Funnily enough, I guess it's why I have many of them though I never cast them off. I've always had a preference for larger figures, thus I end up buying a lot of 1/6 which are generally castoffable.

    Once again, really interesting and thanks for posting some "concrete" data. It really helps to better understand this phenomenon.
    Hace 3 meses
    2pt
    Hmmm. I see.
    For me, I used a web crawler to download all the information regarding the figures into an excel. This included the name of figures, price, listing dates, scale... anything on the page was downloaded.

    Then, I basically sorted the information in the excel. I can't really use your method since theres tens of thousand of data points in MFC.

    vgadict (Hace 3 meses) #48905723I was able to use the built-in search capability of the site's search engine for all of the information gathering. Once figures are linked to a club, you can select the figure list from the club, and then run various queries specific to those figures. (see - browse.v4.php?c...) This was one of the major benefits gained from linking the 1000+ nopan figures.
    For the release date and scale, the searching is really simple. For example, select Release date, and then enter a 4-digit year (you can skip the month & day). Then I just entered each year one at a time and recorded how many figures matched the query for that year. I tracked them in a spreadsheet, and then used that to make the graph. The fact that some figures don't have a release date entered complicated it slightly, but I was able to cross-check my data by listing the figures in release date order. Those without a release date end up grouped at the end. The process for the scale search was similar.
    For the company info, I needed to do some extra work to first determine which companies were represented. To do that, I manually looked through all (or at least nearly all) of the figures to get the list of companies for the linked figures. Then I entered them one-by-one with the search set to Companies to see how many figures matched the search criteria for a specific company, and then recorded the results for each into my spreadsheet.
    Hace 3 meses
    1pt
    azaziel666 (Hace 3 meses) #48905540Hmm. Interesting research. As a fellow data analyst, I am curious on how you gathered your data. Did you use a web crawler to crawl MFC because thats what I did.
    I did a price analysis of the figures myself for the past year.
    you can see it here thread/13794
    I havnt updated it in a year though

    I was able to use the built-in search capability of the site's search engine for all of the information gathering. Once figures are linked to a club, you can select the figure list from the club, and then run various queries specific to those figures. (see - browse.v4.php?c...) This was one of the major benefits gained from linking the 1000+ nopan figures.

    For the release date and scale, the searching is really simple. For example, select Release date, and then enter a 4-digit year (you can skip the month & day). Then I just entered each year one at a time and recorded how many figures matched the query for that year. I tracked them in a spreadsheet, and then used that to make the graph. The fact that some figures don't have a release date entered complicated it slightly, but I was able to cross-check my data by listing the figures in release date order. Those without a release date end up grouped at the end. The process for the scale search was similar.

    For the company info, I needed to do some extra work to first determine which companies were represented. To do that, I manually looked through all (or at least nearly all) of the figures to get the list of companies for the linked figures. Then I entered them one-by-one with the search set to Companies to see how many figures matched the search criteria for a specific company, and then recorded the results for each into my spreadsheet.
    Hace 3 meses
    2pt
    Hmm. Interesting research. As a fellow data analyst, I am curious on how you gathered your data. Did you use a web crawler to crawl MFC because thats what I did.
    I did a price analysis of the figures myself for the past year.

    you can see it here thread/13794
    I havnt updated it in a year though
    Hace 3 meses
    1pt
    tachola loves you!!
    great research, this is one of the best things ive seen come out of this site. love this!
    your videos are really cute btw
    Hace 3 meses
    2pt
    Moeromoero (Hace 3 meses) #48896882Really detailed analysis. Thanks.
    Hope the market can grow even larger for castoff and nopan.

    Lies, damned lies, and nopan
    -- Benjamin Disraeli
    Hace 3 meses
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